MESENE

MESENE, the land of southern Mesopotamia extending from about 24 mi. (40 km.) below Kut al-Amāra to the Persian Gulf. This area was also called Characene, a term giving political identification derived from Charax Spasinu, name of the fortified capital city of the district. During the late Middle Ages the name was replaced by that of the new capital and port of the district, Basra. The economy of Charax depended on her role as the main port and relay point for east-west trade on the upper Persian Gulf. During the first and second centuries C.E. overland trade developed via Mesene with the Nabatean city of petra and with the Syrian desert emporium of Palmyra (Tadmor), and through these centers with the rich Roman west. A Jewish community existed in Mesene from at least the late Parthian period. During the reign of Artabanus V (209–27 C.E.) a Jewish merchant of Meṣḥhān converted Izates, prince of Adiabene, to Judaism. At this time a second Jewish merchant of Meṣḥān similarly converted a number of women of that city (Jos., Ant. 20: 2, 4).   In talmudic sources of the third century C.E. the Jews of Babylonia refer to Mesenean Jews as imprudent (Kid. 49b), unfit and of tainted descent (Kid. 71b), since "whosoever did not know his family and his tribe made his way there" (Yev. 17a). Marriage between Babylonian Jews and the Jews of the northern Mesenean city of apamea was forbidden (Kid. 71b). The city of Meṣḥān (Charax) is described as being lower than hell, and Harpania, a second city of Mesene (perhaps a variant spelling of Apamea), as being lower still than Meṣḥān (Yev. 17a). This hostility shown by Babylonian Jews may have been caused, in part, by the adoption of elements of Mandeanism by the Jews of Mesene. It has also been noted that the practice of allowing the Jewish dead of Harpania to lie while the shroud was woven (Sanh. 48b) would indicate an adaptation by the Jews of that city of the Zoroastrian practice of exposing a corpse before burial (see obermeyer , 197). A possible preference by Mesenean Jews for the Jerusalem Talmud may have further contributed to their being disliked by the Jews of Babylonia. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: Neubauer, Géogr, 325, 329, 382; E. Peterson, in: ZNW, 27 (1928), 55–98; J. Obermeyer, Die Landschaft Babylonien… (1929), index; S. Nodelman, in: Berytus, 13 (1960); J. Hansman, in: Iranica Antiqua, 8 (1967).

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

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  • MESENE — regionis nomen. Strab. l. 12. Μέση τῆς Τίγροδος, ut Steph. ait: Vide Plin. l. 6. c. 27. An Adiabene, an regio, quam cingit Tigris in 2. alveos scissus, quorum dexter Delas, sinister Tigris dicitur? …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Mesene — Messene fue el nombre de una colonia griega de Sicilia, originalmente fundada con el nombre de Zancle y hoy en día conocida como Mesina. Hay también una Messene en Angola y Bab Messene en Túnez. Mesene(Μεσσήνη) | …   Wikipedia Español

  • Mésène — Characène Expansion approximative du royaume de Characène en 51 avant J. C.. La Characène ou Mésène, était un royaume situé à l embouchure du Tigre et de l Euphrate, sur le Golfe Arabo persique. Créé à la fin du IIe siècle avant J. C., ce royaume …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Mesene — ▪ ancient region, Iraq also called  Characene , Persian  Meshan        ancient Parthian vassal state located in the south of Babylonia (modern southern Iraq). After the fall of the Seleucid king Antiochus VII Sidetes in 129 BC, a local prince,… …   Universalium

  • Mesenė — Sp Mesènė Ap Μεσσήνη/Messēnē, Messini Sp sen. Mesènija Ap Μεσσήνη/Messēnē, Messini L sen. gr. polis, dab. mst. ir nomas PV Graikijoje …   Pasaulio vietovardžiai. Internetinė duomenų bazė

  • mesene — ˈme]ˌzēn, ˈmē], ]ˌsēn adjective Etymology: German mesen, from mes + en as in euryen euryene more at euryene : having a forehead of moderate proportions with an upper facial index of 48 to 53 on the living or of 50 to 55 on the skull • meseny nē… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Shapur de Mésène — (IIIe siècle) fut un prince perse sassanide et un roi de Mésène. Shapur de Perse était le troisième fils de Shapur Ier, Empereur sassanide de Perse, et de son épouse, la reine Gurdzad. Encore jeune, il reçut de la part de son père l apanage… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hormizd (fils de Shapur de Mésène) — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Hormizd. Hormizd Sassan fut un prince sassanide du IIIe siècle de notre ère. Il était le fils aîné de Shapur de Mésène, troisième fils de Shapur Ier, Empereur sassanide de Perse. C est la grande inscription de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hormizdak (fils de Shapur de Mésène) — Hormizdak Sassan fut un prince sassanide du IIIe siècle de notre ère. Il était le second fils de Shapur de Mésène, troisième fils de Shapur Ier, Empereur sassanide de Perse. C est la grande inscription de Naqsh e Rostam qui nous relève son… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Péroz (fils de Shapur de Mésène) — Péroz Sassan fut un prince sassanide du IIIe siècle de notre ère. Il était le fils cadet de Shapur de Mésène, troisième fils de Shapur Ier, Empereur sassanide de Perse. C est la grande inscription de Naqsh e Rostam qui nous relève son… …   Wikipédia en Français

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